Dynamic Business Logo
Home Button
Bookmark Button

Creel Price – entrepreneur profile and video interview

From scaling some of the highest mountains in the world, to working with Richard Branson on the future of philanthropy, exiting his business for over $100m and more recently captaining Australia in the World Elephant Polo Championships, he is the high octane adventurer at the forefront of what he now calls the “entreprenaissance”.

Creel PriceCreel Price is part of a new breed of social entrepreneurs, or as Creel calls them “socialpreneurs”; Entrepreneurs that are no longer motivated by their own self-interests, and are now focusing on the big picture. “A socialpreneur is someone that uses their entrepreneurial ability to make a difference on the planet.” Creel explains.

Like many socialpreneurs, Creel believes that the problems faced on the planet are not going to be fixed by Governments, corporations or charitable ventures but rather by social enterprise – organisations that utilise commerce for social benefit.  “Government’s try to use regulation to redirect funds with often little success. Corporations can be well meaning but often have to serve the needs of their shareholders before anything else. Charities can do a fantastic job on one hand but sometimes a large percentage of funds go to administration and they need to put out their hand again at the start of each year which I don’t think is sustainable.”

Rather, Creel believes the major shifts are going to come from entrepreneurs. “For me it’s entrepreneurial thinking that’s actually going to take the world to the next stage. It’s about how do we get entrepreneurs that are commercially savvy, and put that intelligence to good use. What we’re talking about is a combination of commerce and charity working together.” It was this thinking which propelled him to be the Virgin Unit Entrepreneur of the Quarter, this quarter.

Having cofounded his business at the age of 25 with $5,000, Creel built Blueprint Management Group to 1000 staff and within a decade sold the business for over $100 million. However Creel’s business advice remains profoundly simple.

“Business has become too complex.” Creel explains. “But it doesn’t have to be. There are so many components that can overwhelm entrepreneurs. They’ve got to do the finance, HR, marketing, sales…there’s just so many things that can overwhelm you but the role of an entrepreneur can be a lot simpler than that.”

Creel sees the role of the entrepreneur as being the ability to find and engage great people. “If you can help your people have clarity of what their role is, they can achieve amazing things – particularly when the entrepreneur empowers them with responsibility.”

[Next: Creel’s management style tips and video interview]

He simplifies the different management styles required for each phase by breaking the business life cycle into three stages.

1.     The Income Stage. How do I generate enough income to pay the bills, and eventually pay myself my market salary?

2.     The Profit Stage.  How do we build a model that is scalable, allowing us to drive revenue and profits?

3.     The Value Stage. How do we create a solid business that is ready for sale? In the value stage it stops being about expansion so much and starts being about de-risking the business.

Creel encourages entrepreneurs to start with the end in mind, he draws on lessons learnt from when he climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. “The goal in mountain climbing is not to get to the top of the mountain, it’s actually to get to the top and back down safely and that’s where it parallels business.” He argues it’s not enough for entrepreneurs to know to how to build a big business, it’s also about succession and exiting that business, something the vast majority of entrepreneurs neglect to fully understand.

One of the key elements of a successful exit is for the entrepreneur to no longer be there. “Execute a succession plan to maximise value. The business is worth a huge amount more if the entrepreneur isn’t in the business.” This is about systemising the business to a point where it is scalable, and eventually putting in place a management team and board to manage the business.

Today Creel is involved in numerous ventures that are about encouraging this movement. He educates entrepreneurs of all ages starting at the age of 10 with his Club Kidpreneur Foundation, working with aspiring entrepreneurs at the Branson School of Entrepreneurship in South Africa and established entrepreneurs as part of his Accelerate your Business program in Australia. To get involved visit www.creelprice.com .

Jack Delosa heads up The Entourage, a movement that connects Australia’s best entrepreneurs with Australia’s next entrepreneurs.

Jack Delosa

Jack Delosa

20-something Jack is executive director of The Entourage, Australia's largest network of 18-to-35 year-old entrepreneurs. He is the youngest Australian in history to sit on the Board of Small Business Development Corporation, a parliamentary elected body which advises the Minister for Small Business. Last year he was one of Dynamic Business Magazine's Young Guns.

View all posts