Dynamic Business Logo
Home Button
Bookmark Button

©unsplash

Xspresso coffee helps Australians balance work and life

Australian business Xpresso Delight has won recognition for its passive income model, which focuses on maintaining a balanced lifestyle, in a recent survey.passive income model

Xpresso Delight was awarded second place in the ‘Lifestyle’ section of the 2010 Top Franchise ‘National Franchisee Satisfaction Survey. The business was recognised for its business model that allows franchisees to install commercial grade gourmet espresso machines into workplaces for free with coffee charged at a low flat rate. The franchisees can then make money every time a coffee is brewed.

The franchise was developed with an emphasise on maintaining a balance between work and play, with the coffee systems simply requiring a simple weekly service, says Xpresso Delight’s founder Stephen Spitz.

“We wanted to create a business which didn’t require franchisees to turn up to work 9 –to-5 everyday and would be suitable for retirees, mums and people with other commitments”

“Our business model is based on maximising the time-to-money ratio which means franchisees are able to earn better than the national average wage by working less than 10 hours per week,” Mr Spitz added.

Recent statistics show that Australians have the most difficulty achieving the right work balance, with Australia taking the top spot for longest work hours anywhere in the developed world.

Xpresso Delight Newcastle Franchisee Vic Hankins said his franchise yielded him a solid income and still gave him plenty of time to indulge his passions.

“My Xpresso Delight business takes about 10 hours per week which I break up into two days. The business earns around $45,000 gross profit per annum which is very strong for the time involved,” Mr Hankins said.

As an added incentive Xpresso Delight guarantees franchisees a minimum 40 percent revenue return on capital investment within the first six months or their franchise fee is refunded. The measure was put in place in an effort to reduce some of the risk of going into business.