Technology access on-the-go vital for employee productivity

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business traveller on mobile phone

A third of local business travellers are forced to endure poor technology when on-the-go, which significantly hampers their productivity and efficiency on the road.

According to a study by Carlson Wagonlit Travel Australia (CWT) titles CWT Australian Business Traveller Insights: Mobile Technology, good access to mobile technology is vital for workers’ productivity, satisfaction and retention. Poor access on the road inhibits efficiency, and connectivity with both professional and personal contacts.

The report found that workers within the government, health and education, finance, banking and insurance sectors make up the majority of those experiencing sub-par technology when travelling.

The study’s findings also consider the impact of social media on business travel, with an overwhelming 82 percent of respondents claiming “social contact” e.g. keeping up with family and friends, as the greatest benefit of connectivity whilst travelling.

Workers also rated ease of contact, maintaining productivity, and saving time as the other top benefits of increased technology.

CWT regional managing director Peter Brady said organisations that are too slow to adopt or invest in new technologies and the right tools for their travelling workers miss opportunities for savings.

“The true value of supporting the traveller and the business travel experience extends beyond that of the bottom line. It’s critical for organisations to understand the needs of their travellers and to provide them with the right tools to help support them in meeting the business’s objectives, as well as those of the individual traveler.”

Those surveyed pointed to real-time alerts, mobile check-ins, in-flight wi-fi and mobile paperless boarding passes as the top innovations that enhanced their productivity whilst travelling.

The study also suggests that as a new generation of tech-savvy employees enter the workforce, organisations will need to upgrade their level of technology connectivity and social media accessibility.