Microsoft launches Windows 7

Microsoft launches Windows 7
Microsoft has officially kicked off the launch of new operating system Windows 7 as a replacement for much-derided Windows Vista.
In an effort to distance themselves from the poorly-received Vista platform, the company has adopted a different method to market the new operating software by recruiting Windows users to host their own Tupperware-style Windows 7 house parties to spread the good word on the new OS.
“Were not about big events any more. We are about listening to what users have got to say,” said James DeBragga, general manager of Windows consumer product marketing.
Australia has become the traditional launch market for Microsoft as it rolls out the new operating system in a series of events that will follow the sun in a 24-hour marketing frenzy. Microsoft estimates 60,000 enthusiasts worldwide will hold house parties in the coming week, with 1500 of these in Australia.
There has been a lot of hype surrounding the launch of the new product, with some developers already praising the software, while others are less enthusiastic.
According to Salesforce.com the future for businesses is not in the operating system, it’s in the cloud.
Commenting on the launch, Marc Benioff, salesforce.com CEO said: “The best thing Windows 7 has going for it is that it is not Vista. The truth is that the operating system is irrelevant now. It’s all about the cloud–cloud applications for consumers and businesses, and cloud platforms like Force.com, Amazon Web Services, and Google App Engine.”
Meanwhile, research company Gartner predicts that, in 2010, Windows 7 will become the dominant operating system on new PCs with nearly 66 percent of all new PCs preloaded with Windows 7 by the end of the year.
“When looking at the overall installed base – Windows 7 is expected to overtake Vista as the main operating system in 2012 with 53 per cent of installed PCs running that version of Windows OS,” the researcher said.
According to Microsoft the new technology is faster, more efficient and simplifies everyday tasks for the user.
In terms of pricing, a free upgrade of Windows 7 will be offered to those buying a Vista PC from the end of June to the end of January, reports The Sydney Morning Herald.
The Home Premium version of the operating system is expected to cost $299 (or $199 for an upgrade version), the Professional $449 ($399 upgrade) and the Ultimate $469 ($429 upgrade).

Microsoft has officially kicked off the launch of new operating system Windows 7 as a replacement for much-derided Windows Vista.

In an effort to distance themselves from the poorly-received Vista platform, the company has adopted a different method to market the new operating software by recruiting Windows users to host their own Tupperware-style Windows 7 house parties to spread the good word on the new operating system.

“Were not about big events any more. We are about listening to what users have got to say,” said James DeBragga, general manager of Windows consumer product marketing.

Microsoft estimates 60,000 enthusiasts worldwide will hold house parties in the coming week, with 1,500 of these in Australia.

There has been a lot of hype surrounding the launch of the new operating system, with some developers already praising the software, while others are less enthusiastic.

According to Salesforce.com CEO Marc Benioff, the future for businesses is not in the operating system, it’s in the cloud.

“The best thing Windows 7 has going for it is that it is not Vista. The truth is that the operating system is irrelevant now. It’s all about the cloud–cloud applications for consumers and businesses, and cloud platforms like Force.com, Amazon Web Services, and Google App Engine,” he said.

Meanwhile, research company Gartner predicts that, in 2010, Windows 7 will become the dominant operating system on new PCs with nearly 66 percent of all new PCs preloaded with Windows 7 by the end of the year.

According to Microsoft the new operating system is faster, more efficient and simplifies everyday tasks for the user.

For more information, please visit www.microsoft.com/australia/windows

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