Managers urged to take a holiday

Managers urged to take a holiday
Companies are being urged to encourage their managers to take a holiday and stop stockpiling leave, The Australian reports.
According to the reports, the nation’s largest employer group said companies should capitalise on Labour’s National Employment Standards, which sets out guidelines requiring an employee to take paid annual leave, but only if the requirement is reasonable.
According to the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, 73 per cent of national leave stockpilers are likely to be executives, managers and professionals earning more than $70,000 annually.
Peter Anderson, the chamber’s chief executive told The Australian yesterday that executives often refused to take leave for fear of redundancy, or believing they are too important to the organisation.
“Where managers or professionals have loaded up a very large stockpile and are using it almost as a redundancy fund, then a strategy to try and run down that stockpile more actively might be justified,” he told the newspaper.

Companies are being urged to encourage their managers to take a holiday and to stop stockpiling leave, The Australian reports.

According to the reports, the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI), said companies should capitalise on Labor’s National Employment Standards, which sets out guidelines requiring an employee to take paid annual leave, but only if the requirement is reasonable.

According to the ACCI, 73 percent of national leave stockpilers are likely to be executives, managers and professionals earning more than $70,000 annually.

Peter Anderson, the chamber’s chief executive told The Australian yesterday that executives often refused to take leave for fear of redundancy, or through believing they are too important to the organisation.

“The ordinary wage and salary earners tend to take leave on a more regular basis and in a more organised way. Managers and professionals, the people who believe they are almost indispensable….are the category of staff where the biggest problem exists; and it becomes an ingrained cultural problem,” he said.

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