Australians slugged with higher e-book costs

Australians slugged with higher e-book costs
Online retail giant Amazon is in hot water after it was revealed that Australian Kindle users will have to pay 40 percent more than Americans for their e-books.
Despite promising on its website, that there are “no additional charges” for delivering books to overseas users, an Amazon spokesman told The Guardian that the average e-book would cost $US13.99 for foreign customers, 40 percent more than the American price of $US9.99.
“International customers do pay a higher price for their books than US customers due to higher operating costs outside of the US,” the Amazon spokeswoman said.
It is understood Amazon has raised prices because the device is being sold through Amazon.com and not local divisions, and that data will be downloaded from the American website, meaning foreign users must effectively pay “international roaming” fees.
The decision has angered the local publishing industry, with many publishers expressing serious reservations about supporting the device.
According to Australian Publishers Association spokesman Jose Borghino rights negotiations between publishers and Amazon were ongoing and publishers were negotiating their own deals individually.

Online retail giant Amazon is in hot water after it was revealed that international Kindle users will have to pay more than Americans for their e-books.

Despite promising on its website, that there are “no additional charges” for delivering books to overseas users, an Amazon spokesman told The Guardian that the average e-book would cost $US13.99 for customers in the EU (including VAT), up to 40 percent more than the American price of $US9.99, while the price for the e-books for customers outside of the US and the EU is $US11.99.

“International customers do pay a higher price for their books than US customers due to higher operating costs outside of the US,” the Amazon spokesman said.

It is understood Amazon has raised prices because the device is being sold through Amazon.com and not local divisions, and that data will be downloaded from the American website, meaning foreign users must effectively pay “international roaming” fees.

The decision has angered the local publishing industry, with many publishers expressing serious reservations about supporting the device.

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