Internet browsers affect work performance

Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer. While many have an opinion as to which internet browser is best, new data suggests there is a strong correlation between the internet browser used by an employee and their work performance levels.

Cornerstone OnDemand analyzed data sourced from around 50,000 customers that took their 45-minute online job assessment and were subsequently hired at a firm. The results revealed those that used Firefox or Chrome ended up staying at their jobs 15 per cent longer than those using Internet Explorer or Safari. Not only that, they performed better.

The focus was on candidates entering customer-service and sales jobs for businesses in telecommunication, retail and hospitality industries.

Although the reasons behind Firefox and Chrome’s positive results weren’t clarified, Cornerstone Chief Analytics Officer Michael Housman put it down to something along the lines of being “informed.”

“I think that the fact that you took the time to install Firefox on your computer shows us something about you. It shows that you’re someone who is an informed consumer,” Mr Housman told Freakonomics Radio.

“You’ve made an active choice to do something that wasn’t default.”

The research could be valuable information for a variety of industries suffering from a high turnover rate. It’s no secret that hiring new staff can end up costing business big dough, and while Mr Housman said Cornerstone’s clients don’t usually take browser choice into account when choosing staff, browser speed and its capability to keep employees “informed” clearly has an effect on their productivity.

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