Cyber criminals use fear to prey on consumers

Cyber criminals use fear to prey on consumers
Symantec Corp. today announced the findings of its Report on Rogue Security Software, revealing that cybercriminals are employing increasingly persuasive online scare tactics to convince users to purchase rogue security software.
The study’s findings, based on data obtained during the 12-month period of July 2008 to June 2009, reveal that cybercriminals are using sneaky tactics to encourage unsuspecting users to install their rogue software, preying on their fears of security threats.
The study found that  93 percent of the software installations for the top 50 rogue security software scams were intentionally downloaded by the user, at a cost of between AUD$30 to $100.
According to Symantec, the ads typically include false claims such as “If this ad is flashing, your computer may be at risk or infected,” urging the user to follow a link to scan their computer or get software to remove the threat.
The findings of our Report on Rogue Security Software make it clear that cybercriminals are willing, eager, and well-equipped to prey on today’s Internet user,” said Stephen Trilling, senior vice president, Symantec Security Technology and Response.
“To avoid becoming a victim of such predatory practices, Symantec strongly urges Internet users to make sure they are using the latest security protection and always obtain their security software directly from trusted vendors’ websites.”

Symantec Corp. today announced the findings of its Report on Rogue Security Software, revealing that cyber criminals are employing increasingly persuasive online scare tactics to convince users to purchase rogue security software.

The study’s findings, based on data obtained during the 12-month period of July 2008 to June 2009, reveal that cyber criminals are using sneaky tactics to encourage unsuspecting users to install their rogue software, preying on their fears of security threats.

The study found that  93 percent of the software installations for the top 50 rogue security software scams were intentionally downloaded by the user, at a cost of between AUD$30 to $100.

According to Symantec, the ads typically include false claims such as: “If this ad is flashing, your computer may be at risk or infected,” urging the user to follow a link to scan their computer or get software to remove the threat.

“The findings of our Report on Rogue Security Software make it clear that cybercriminals are willing, eager, and well-equipped to prey on today’s internet user,” said Stephen Trilling, senior vice president, Symantec Security Technology and Response.

“To avoid becoming a victim of such predatory practices, Symantec strongly urges internet users to make sure they are using the latest security protection and always obtain their security software directly from trusted vendors’ websites.”

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